Cinnamon

Latin Name

Cinnamomum zeylanicum

Family

Lauraceae

Chemotype

Eugenol

Distilled Component

Leaves

Traditionally Known Properties

Antiseptic, antibacterial, antiviral, antifungal, antiferment. Parasiticide. Tonic and general stimulant. Aphrodisiac.

Precautions

Not recommended for pregnant or nursing women, and children under the age of 6. Dermocaustic: Always dilute (maximum 20 %) in vegetable oil.

Anecdote

Several legends exist about the picking of cinnamon, often described as perilous and magical. It is believed to spontaneously self-combust like a phoenix; in fact, according to mythology, cinnamon is found in its nest. It would attract money and give strength and courage. The bark of the Cinnamon tree -the cinnamon- has been known for more than 4,500 years. The Egyptians combined it with aloe, myrrh and other substances to embalm the deads. Later, cinnamon oil was considered holy oil. It is also believed to have stimulating and aphrodisiac properties, as referred to in Tales from a Thousand and One Nights.